J ust about everyone has had a bad romantic relationship in their life. One that was probably doing more harm than good, and eventually it ends because either one or both of you are just over it. If your partner was constantly bailing on you and putting you down – wouldn't you break things off?

Most of us realize when that relationship has reached the point of no return and cut our losses. But what about your friendships?

If you're still unsure ask yourself this: If you were in an emergency situation, could you count on them to help?


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When was the last time you evaluated if the "friends" in your life were really enhancing your life or adding to the drama?

Chances are, there are at least one or two people who are not beneficial to your life, abuse your generosity, or simply don't put forth any effort unless it's advantageous for them. If you're still unsure ask yourself this: If you were in an emergency situation, could you count on them to help? If you have any hesitation, the answer is no. Additionally, here are 23 warning signs of a toxic friend.

Friend breakup 2

We sometimes stay friends with people because we always have been, but not really for any other reason. It could be the person you've known since high school, or maybe the former co-worker who you really don’t have much in common with anymore.

That can be fine for the occasional get together or maybe an occasional dinner, unless you find that every time you spend time together you end up feeling bad afterwards. Unfortunately, some people make themselves feel better by putting others down. And just like the bully in school, they will continue the same behavior unless something changes. If you find yourself in that situation, the relationship is probably toxic and needs to end. Here are some ways to go about the breakup:

Save the Drama (When You Can)

These relationships don't all have to end in a dramatic fashion. They can sometimes just fizzle out if you don’t fan the flames. If this friend is confrontational, it may be best to just not return their calls until they get the hint. While this form of ghosting might seem like taking the easy way out, remember that their drama is why you are breaking up with them in the first place.

Offer Your Point of View

If you feel the need to explain the relationship ending, you can simply tell them that the relationship feels very one-sided, and they don't seem to value you as a friend. They may not have realized their actions were hurtful, and you may even be able to salvage a friendship. However, don't plan on that happening. At least you can say you were honest and gave them the chance.

Lean on Positive Influences

Another step to take is to make new friends who make a positive impact on your life. Find common interests by joining a club or finding a hobby. Maybe there's a cooking class you have been wanting to take, or possibly someone at the gym you chat with sometimes. Making friends can be more difficult as we get older, but having a positive circle of friends will help you stay away from the negative relationships that leave you feeling unfulfilled and bad about yourself.

No matter how you end the relationship, it's important that you end it somehow. It will be better for your self esteem, and will help clear your schedule for the meaningful friendships you won't be missing out on anymore.


READ NEXT: 3 Steps to Becoming Wisely Selfish

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Author: Amber Sullivan

Amber Sullivan works in Corporate and Strategic Messaging and is also a freelance writer. She is a mother, wife, animal lover and stays up way too late reading.